News Archive

Revisiting Populism, Democracy and Gender: Challenges of the 21st Century

Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall

Haideh Moghissi, Emerita Professor and Senior Scholar, York University, Toronto will present a lecture "Revisiting Populism, Democracy and Gender: Challenges of the 21st Century on Thursday, November 9 at 4:10pm.

California Dreamin’: Enlightened Utopias and Politics in Eighteenth-Century New Spain

Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall

María Bárbara Zepeda-Cortés, Assistant Professor, Department of History will give a talk "California Dreamin': Enlightened Utopias and Politics in Eighteenth-Century New Spain" on Wednesday, November 8 at 4:10pm.
Why Can't a Muslim Be a Refugee?: Refugees and the Rise of the Novel.

Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman 200

The refugee is a literary invention. How is it that Anglo-American literature conceptualized the refugee first and with greater complexity than law did? Sharif Youssef turns to seventeenth and eighteenth-century texts such as Hobbes’ Leviathan, Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year, and Kant’s The Metaphysics of Morals to trace how the concept of the refugee emerges and proves incompatible with the Muslim concept of dutiful exile as understood by the Orientalist William Marsden. Why is it that the liberal conception of the refugee is at odds with the Muslim doctrine of hijrah (هِجْرَة)?

Sharif Youssef is a JD Candidate in his final year of study at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He holds a PhD from the University of Chicago and a post-doctoral MsL (Master of Studies of Law) from the University of Toronto where he has returned to complete his JD after two years of leave spent as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought at Amherst College and a Lecturer in English at Clemson University. His book project, The Actuarial Form: Moral Hazard in the Early Novel, is about the emergence of the categories of risk and information in the use of mass casualty statistics in eighteenth-century works of literature and political economy. He has edited “Inevitability,” a special issue of Modern Language Quarterly on the subject of inevitability in legal and literary theory, and an anthology entitled, The Hostile Takeover: Human Rights after Corporate Personhood. His writing has appeared in Law and LiteratureModern Language QuarterlyCriticism, and Humanity.

Bethlehem Area Public Library

The Bethlehem Area Public Library is being added to a national list of Literary Landmarks. A new plaque honoring the birthplace of the great 20th century poet Hilda Doolittle (1886 –1961) will be unveiled Friday, September 8th at a 4pm ceremony that will include readings of Doolittle’s work. The effort to get the location designated as a Literary Landmark is a result of a partnership between the library and Lehigh University’s English department and Humanities Center

Doolittle’s childhood home was located just across the plaza from the Library, where City Hall now stands. Her innovative and experimental poetry and prose established her as a leading Modernist artist in the 1910s and 1920s. She remains the Lehigh Valley’s most important literary figure.

The Literary Landmarks Association includes homes of famous writers (Tennessee Williams, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, William Faulkner), libraries and museum collections, literary scenes, and even “Grip” the Raven, formerly the pet of Charles Dickens and inspiration to Edgar Allan Poe and now presiding (stuffed) at the Rare Books Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia.

The event on September 8 is to be held at the Main Library, 11 W. Church Street.

For more information email jberk@bapl.org or call the Main Library at 610-867-3761 x215.

The Historian's Eye: Meditations on Photography, History, and the American Present

Matthew Jacobson, Professor of American Studies, History & African American Studies at Yale University will present a lecture "The Historian's Eye: Meditations on Photography, History, and the American Present" in Fairchild Martindale Library, 5th floor.

Black Life--Schwarz-Sein

Alexander G. Weheliye, Professor of African American Studies at Northwestern University will present a lecture "Black Life--Schwarz-Sein" in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.

Cultural Agents: Why Art?

Doris Sommer is the Ira and Jewell Williams Jr. Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of African and African American Studies at Harvard University, where she is Founder and Director of Cultural Agents: Arts and Humanities in Civic Engagement.  She is the author of Bilingual Aesthetics: A New Sentimental Education and editor of Cultural Agency in the Americas, both published by Duke University Press.  The public lecture will be held in Sinclair Auditorium.

Humanities Center Faculty Research Grants

The College of Arts and Sciences and the Office of the Vice President and Associate Provost for Research and Graduate Studies have provided additional funding to the Humanities Center for research grants in the Humanities.

See pdf link below for additional information.

Lecture and discussion with filmmakers

Lecture and discussion with filmmakers in the Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall.

See pdf below for additional information.

Sponsored by the Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative

RELATIVES Lecture

Elizabeth Brake, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Arizona State University will present a lecture "Love and the Law: Legal Support for Diverse Family Forms" in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.

Creating Pathways Through Poetry and Music

Frank Waln and Tanaya Winder will present a lecture and performance Dream Warriors: Creating Pathways Through Poetry and Music in the Lamberton Hall Great Room.

Co-sponsored with the Associate Dean's Office for Interdisciplinary Programs, the Dialogue Center, Africana Studies, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Office of Multicultural Affairs and the Women's Center

Relatives Lecture

Christopher Reed, Professor of English and Visual Culture at the Pennsylvania State University will present a lecture "'The Society of Buggers': The Bloomsbury Group as Queer Family" in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.

Relatives Lecture

***CANCELED***

Ann Little, Associate Professor of History at Colorado State University will present a lecture on "The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright: Communities of Women in the Northeastern Borderlands" in the Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall.

Co-sponsored with the Gibson Institute for Eighteenth-Century Studies

RELATIVES Lecture

Naomi Cahn, the Harold H. Greene Professor of Law at George Washington Law School, will present a lecture "The Multiple Meanings of Marriage Equality" on Thursday, February 4 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.

Co-sponsored with Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Health, Medicine and Society

Relatives Lecture

Nayan Shah will present a lecture entitled "Intimacy, Estrangement and Transnational Ties" on Thursday, November 19 at 4:10pm in the Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall.

Nayan Shah is Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California.

Co-sponsored with American Studies and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Summer Research Grant Presentation

Please join us on Thursday, November 12 at 12 noon in the Humanities Center as Khurram Hussain, Assistant Professor of Religion shares the outcome of his Summer Faculty Research Grant "Can the Muslim Speak?".

Relatives Lecture

C. Riley Snorton will present a lecture "Jorgensen's Shadows" on Thursday, October 22 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.

C. Riley Snorton is an assistant professor in Africana studies and feminist, gender and sexuality studies at Cornell University.

Joint event with Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies and co-sponsored with Africana Studies.

Relatives Lecture

Gil Anidjar will present a lecture "Whodunit?" on Thursday, October 8, 2015 at 4:10pm in the Global Commons Room, Williams Hall.

Gil Anidjar is Professor in the Department of Religion & the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies, Columbia University

Co-sponsored with the Berman Center for Jewish Studies

Women, Gender & Sexuality, the Women's Center and the Humanities Center

Loretta Ross, Co-founder and the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective will present a lecture entitled "Understanding Reproductive Justice in the 21st Century" on Tuesday, September 22 at 7:30pm in Williams Hall, Global Commons.

See flyer linked below for additional information.

Inter(Play) Hip Hop Symposium – May 1 to May 3, 2015

Investigating Hip Hop's intersections with social justice, entertainment and identity, the Inter(Play) Hip Hop Symposium will feature talks and performance workshops by nationally and internationally recognized Hip Hop artists, scholars and Lehigh University students.

ASHERU, Hip Hop artist, educator, and youth activist, widely known for performing the opening and closing themes for the popular TV series, The Boondocks, as well as his pioneering and innovative efforts to forward the Hip Hop Education movement, will give a keynote address on Saturday, May 2nd at 12:00pm. Symposium attendees will also have the opportunity to participate in interactive workshops on beat-making, music technology; and health, wellness and healing.

The 5th Element Open Mic Show will be held at the Born into the Arts Dance Studio, minutes away from the Lehigh University campus. This show will feature a live DJ, guest artist performances, local MCs, B-Boy & B-Girl dance battles, spoken word poetry, graffiti art and more.

The symposium concludes on Day 3, with a Hip Hop theater play featuring Lehigh University students in Act Like You Know 7.0 Final Show, at the Diamond Theater in the Zoellner Arts Center.

For more details, check out the Inter(Play) Hip Hop Symposium website!

www.interplayhiphop.com

The Lehigh Review is an undergraduate-run academic journal showcasing the best written and visual research that Lehigh students have to offer.

Join us for the unveiling of the 23rd edition of the Lehigh Review! Pick up a copy of the journal and enjoy light refreshments from Sotto Santi, Deja Brew, and Lehigh Catering!

--Lehigh Review Staff--
Editor in Chief: Ali Correll
Design Editor: Justine Gaetano
Marketing Editor: Tori Yu
Staff Editors: Abby Johnson, Betsy Powers, Catherine Preysner, Erin Hanlon, and Monica Shell
Facilitator: Laura Kremmel

--Lehigh Review Contributors--
Barbara Tsaousis, Christopher Herrera, Danielle Campbell, Elizabeth Phillips, Erin Lidl, Grace Johnjulio, Hannah Han, Jaclyn Sands, Jade Van Streepen, Jonelle Jerwick, Katie Hooven, Kerstin Schkrioba, Luchen Wang, Min Jun Kim, Monika Martin, Natalie Tacka, Nina Miotto, Prarthna Johri, Rachel Mayer, Robert Mason, Sathya Ram, Savannah Boylan, Yiyi Chen, Yuqing Ye, and Zhenyu Li

postHUMANities Lecture

Jasbir K. Puar, Associate Professor, Women's & Gender Studies at Rutgers University will give a lecture entitled "Debility/Capacity:  From Narrative Prosthesis to Disaster Capitalism".

Jasbir K. Puar is Associate Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers University and the author of Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times (Duke University Press), which won the 2007 Cultural Studies Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies. Professor Puar's forthcoming monograph, Affective Politics: States of Debility and Capacity (Duke University Press, 2014) takes up questions of disability in the context of theories of bodily assemblages that trouble intersectional identity frames. 

For additional information:  http://www.jasbirpuar.com/

Sponsored with the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

 

postHUMANities Lecture

J. Andrew Brown will present a lecture "Evolving Posthumanities in Latin American Literature: The Case of Edmundo Paz Soldán's Iris" on Thursday, March 19, 2015 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library Room 200.

J. Andrew Brown is Associate Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature, Washington University in St. Louis.

Summer Faculty Research Grant Presentation

Please join us on Friday, March 6 at 12 noon in the Humanities Center as Kate Crassons, Associate Professor of English and Director, Lehigh University Press, shares the outcome of her Summer Research Grant "Chaucer's Saint Cecilia and the Insecurities of Faith".Bring your lunch...cookies and drinks provided.

Summer Research Grant Presentation

Please join us on Friday, February 27 at 12 noon in the Humanities Center as Amanda Brown, PhD Candidate in History, shares the outcome of her Summer Research Grant "Pragmatic Christianity: Howard Thurman, The Church for the Fellowship of All Peoples, and the Twentieth Century American Intellectual Tradition".
Bring your lunch...cookies and drinks provided.

postHUMANities Lecture

Kalpana Seshadri will present a lecture "What is Post-Human Economics?" on Thursday, February 19 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.

Kalpana Seshadri is Professor in the Department of English, Boston College.

postHUMANities Lecture

Susan Pearson will present a lecture "Sentiment and Savagery: Collapsing the Boundary Between Animals and Children in U.S. History" on Thursday, January 29 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.

Susan Pearson is Associate Professor of History at Northwestern University.

This lecture is co-sponsored with the American Studies Program.

Faculty Grant Presentation

Please join us on Friday, December 5 at 12 noon in the Humanities Center as Anna Chupa, Associate Professor of Design, shares the outcome of her Faculty Research Grant "The Royal Path of the Mystical Serpent:  An Autobiography of Priestess Miriam Williams as Told to Anna Chupa" with an introduction by Susan Kart.

Faculty Grant Presentation

Please join us on Wednesday, November 12 at 12 noon in the Humanities Center as Nitzan Lebovic, Assitant Professor of History, shares the outcome of his Faculty Research Grant "Zionist Melancholia."

Join The Lehigh Review Staff!

For the past twenty-two years, Lehigh University has published The Lehigh Review, an entirely student-produced journal of academic work. Each issue contains some of the best scholarly writing and artwork by Lehigh undergraduates. The staff is made up of Lehigh undergraduate students who take this course for either 1 credit (staff) or 4 credits (editor). The available positions are as follows: one marketing editor (4-credits), one graphic design editor (4-credits), one editor-in-chief (4-credits), and several copy editors (1-credit). Copy editors can be from any major or field of study who would be interested in working on the journal!

For more information and to apply to be on the staff, email Laura Kremmel at lrk207@lehigh.edu.

postHUMANities Lecture

Kellie Robertson will present a lecture "Nature's Voices: On Hearing Beyond the Human" on Thursday, November 6 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.

Kellie Robertson is Associate Professor of English at the Univeristy of Maryland.

postHUMANities Lecture

David Bates will present a lecture "An Artificial History of Natural Intelligence" on Thursday, October 23, 2014 at 4:10pm in SINCLAIR AUDITORIUM.

David Bates is Professor in the Department of Rhetoric at UC Berkeley.

postHUMANities Lecture
Cary Wolfe will present a lecture entitled "Wallace Steven's Birds" on Thursday, September 18 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.
 
Cary Wolfe is Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Professor of English; Founding Director, 3CT: Center for Critical and Cultural Theory, Rice University
 
Co-sponsored with the English Department and American Studies Program
 
HOME Lecture

Eva Morales Soler, Architect and Activist, will give a public lecture entitled "Mas que una casa/More than a House:  New Communities against Home Evictions".  The Lecture will take place on Thursday, November 14 at 4:10pm in Sinclair Auditorium.

Sponsored by the Humanities Center with support from Modern Languages and Literatures and Art, Architecture and Design
 
HOME Lecture

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, University Professor, Columbia University will give a lecture entitled "Home?" on Thursday, October 31, 2013 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman 200.

Sponsored by the Humanities Center with support from Modern Languages and Literatures, English, Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology, Religion Studies, Global Studies, and Latin American Studies.
 
SPYNNYNGE
David J. Fine, Graduate Student, English and Interim Assistant Director, Global Citizenship Program will give a talk entitled "Why Augustine? Hannah Arendt and Rebecca West, 1929-1933" on October 24, 2013 at 4:10pm in the Humanities Center, 224 W. Packer Ave.
 
Scholars have recently become interested in the affinity between the post-war reportage of Rebecca West and Hannah Arendt. Rebecca West covered the Nuremberg Trials for The New Yorker only a few years before the magazine would send Hannah Arendt to report, quite memorably, on the trial of Adolf Eichmann. In this talk, I am interested in exploring another commonality between the two women: Saint Augustine. Hannah Arendt finished her doctoral dissertation--Love and Saint Augustine (1929)--only a few years before Rebecca West completed her psychobiography, Saint Augustine (1933). What draws this pair, emerging from two very different traditions, to Saint Augustine at this historical moment? What light does their engagement with Augustine shed on the political work they publish after World War II? 
 
Spynnynge is the Humanities Center working-in-progress series, a space to talk about projects that are incomplete.  In these informal workshops, both students and faculty will meditate on and act within these moments in the midst of creation where it becomes critical, either from despair or excitement to speak with others concerning where to go next, where to go back, and where to begin again for the first time.
 
MOVEMENT Lecture
Ethan Kleinberg will present a lecture entitled Back to Where We've Never Been: Heidegger, Levinas, Derrida on Inhabiting "Tradition" on Thursday, November 29 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Humanities Forum, Linderman Library, Room 200.
 


Ethan Kleinberg is Professor of History and Letters at Wesleyan University Wesleyan University, Executive Editor of History and Theory and Director of Wesleyan University's Center for the Humanities. He is the author of Generation Existential: Martin Heidegger's Philosophy in France, 1927-61, which was awarded the 2006 Morris D. Forkosch prize for the best book in intellectual history, by the Journal of the History of Ideas.
 
Co-sponsored with History and the Berman Center for Jewish Studies
 
MOVEMENT Lecture
Erin Manning will present a lecture "Choreography as Mobile Architecture" on Thursday, November 15 at 4:10pm in the Scheler Family Humanities forum, Linderman Library, Room 200. 
 
Erin Manning holds a University Research Chair in the Faculty of Fine Arts at Concordia University (Montreal, Canada). She is also the director of the Sense Lab (www.senselab.ca), a laboratory that explores the intersections between art practice and philosophy through the matrix of the sensing body in movement. In her art practice she works between painting, dance, fabric and sculpture (http://www.erinmovement.com). Her writing addresses the senses, philosophy and politics, articulating the relation between experience, thought and politics in a transdisciplinary framework moving between dance and new technology, the political and micropolitics of sensation, performance art, and the current convergence of cinema, animation and new media. Her publications include Relationscapes: Movement, Art, Philosophy (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2009), Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty (Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 2007) and Ephemeral Territories: Representing Nation, Home and Identity in Canada (Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 2003). Her presentation will explore how choreographic fields generate their own forms and forces of movement.
 
 
Co-sponsored with Art, Architecture and Design, Philosophy, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies and the Women's Center